Tagged with 'Africa'

Power One runs on Women's Power

Swedish Power One develops renewable energy solutions in Africa and has initiated a collaboration to electrify previously un-electrified areas with the help of women.

 

Power One has developed an energy solution together with L3, consisting of a smaller solar power plant that stores the energy in a number of batteries, which are then distributed by women to the connected homes. With this method, Power One can also offer electrification of areas where an electricity grid becomes too expensive due to distance.

- By distributing the energy with portable batteries instead of a costly grid, we save on grid costs and can instead provide cheap energy and jobs for the population of women in these areas. In this way, we can offer electrification to populations whose ability to pay would otherwise not cover the costs of an electricity grid. A pure win-win arrangement, says Peter Rinaldo, CEO of Power One.

Today's portable batteries are based on lithium, but organic alternatives have already been developed. As these are cheaper and easier to recycle, Power One will switch to organic batteries as soon as they are released on the market. However, the revolution with Power One's solution lies in the method of using women power as distribution instead of expensive electricity grids. It is a great opportunity for these areas to get started with electrification at a lower initial cost.

- Women's power as a distribution method is an organisational model based on a very practical reality analysis, namely that women generally focus more on long-term survival than men do", says Séraphine Barigenera, COO Power One Burundi.

 

Long-term thinking is crucial not only for the climate, but also for the survival on this planet. So, this must also be a base criteria for the economy. Power One has therefore designed an organisation that utilises the wisdoms of African women.

- By utilizing the power of African women, we create a business model that is both transparent, predictable and reliable - and which provides a safe investment for our investors, concludes Séraphine Barigenera, COO Power One Burundi.

Power One stores energy in both water and hydrogen

There is a great demand for energy storage today. Solar energy can only be collected during the daytime and therefore some of the energy generated during the daytime must be stored for night use. There are several efficient ways to store energy today, and different storage models have different advantages and disadvantages, but the most cost-effective way of storing energy today is through water.

 

Batteries are the most common principle of energy storage today. Lithium has a certain environmental impact, mainly in the manufacturing process. Therefore, there is not much that goes for that metal to provide the world with green energy storage.

Hydrogen is a very clean alternative that only needs items. solar energy and water to be manufactured. It is more expensive per stored kilowatt than Kinetic storage and battery storage. However, one of the benefits of hydrogen is that it is transportable to the place where it is needed. Ex. mining companies, factories, schools, etc. The infrastructure that is now being built is a so-called. Return system with tubes containing hydrogen.

Kinetic storage is a pure alternative compared to fossil fuels as an energy carrier. so pumped water is today the most cost-effective energy storage. What stops it is that it does not fit everywhere but the need exists for all green forms of energy storage.

Storage of pumped water is quite simple. The basic structure consists of an upper and a lower pond. From the upper pond, the water passes through a pipeline connected to a turbine generator, just as in all conventional hydroelectric power stations. The difference is that the turbine in a pumped storage facility can be transformed into a pump during the day to pump water back to the upper pond - for night use.

For pumped water storage of energy, there is a total storage potential of about 22 million GWh worldwide. These astonishing figures come from a report recently released by Professor Andrew Blakers and other researchers with the Australian National University's RE100 Group.

"Pumped water already accounts for 97% of electricity storage worldwide due to the low cost", says ANU, "and the proportion of wind and solar cells in the electricity grid is increasing significantly".

The huge storage potential is about a hundred times greater than what is needed to support a 100% global renewable electricity system, "says ANU. An approximate guide to the 100% renewable electricity storage requirements, based on analysis for Australia, is 1 GW of power per million people with 20 hours of storage, which equals 20 GWh per million people.

The concept has been developed by the Australian University and is based on small-scale PWS with a pair of reservoirs, separated by a height difference between 300 and 700 m, and connected by a pipe with a pump / turbine. Water circulates between the upper and lower containers in a closed loop to store and generate power. The stations can have a storage time of 4 to 20 hours and such a network of small-scale PWS provides sufficient storage capacity to stabilize the supply and ensure a stable supply from 100% renewable energy sources.

These smaller versions of PWS are mao. an inexpensive, reliable and sustainable alternative for energy storage. The only thing required is water and altitude difference. The method is thus dependent on the natural terrain, and works in naturally hilly regions.

Some energy companies have taken note of this and have developed these small PWS into a sustainable alternative for storage in areas with natural conditions. For example, the Swedish energy company Power One, which specialises in the electrification of Africa and its huge growth market in energy / stored energy. Now Power One is developing a combined integrated storage in both PWS and hydrogen for its projects in East Africa (Pilot area). In this way, cost-effectiveness will almost double, while Power-One can deliver energy both day and night to its customers.

Using the combination enables Power One to reach larger areas and markets for stored energy.

Welcome to join us on an exciting journey in green energy where there is enormous potential to do good for the planet, while at the same time accelerating development in developing countries. Within this segment, there is money to be made while contributing to a more viable environment.

Power One AB is an energy company that is at the forefront of global development. Right now, there is an issue in which the public has the opportunity to invest in the company.

During Q32020, management expects the company to be listed. www.poweroneburundi.com

 

Renewable energy in Africa can lead the way

The IEA, or International Energy Agency, predicts that solar energy will play a big role in supporting the continent’s growing population and industrialisation over the next 20 years. Africa should be leading the way into the future using renewable energy sources to power production, says an IEA report predicting a solar boom in countries across the continent, which could give hundreds of millions of homes electricity for the first time.

Africa’s population is expected to grow to more than 2 billion people by 2040, a rise of 800 million from today or the population equivalent of the US and Europe combined, says the report. People are expected to turn to cities and towns at a rate never seen before, where the demand for new houses and infrastructure will ignite an energy-hungry industrial revolution.

Fatih Birol, executive director of the IEA, said Africa had a “unique opportunity” to leapfrog the fossil fuel dependency of other industrialised regions.

“I am optimistic about Africa’s energy future – it will surprise pessimists,” Birol said. “I have great expectations for the energy industry in the years to come, both in terms of bringing energy access to Africa’s people but also driving economic growth.”

He urged Africa’s leaders to take advantage of the natural resources available through solar power generation, and the mining of raw minerals needed to make electric and hydrogen batteries, which are in high demand across the world.

Birol said: “Africa’s total contribution to cumulative global emissions from energy over the last 100 years is only 2%, which is half the emissions of Germany today. If everyone in Africa had access to energy this 2% will rise to just 3% – it’s still nothing. It’s peanuts compared to other countries in the world which are using fossil fuels such as coal for energy.

“But while Africa does not contribute to climate change the continent is on the frontline of its potential effects, including droughts. Africa is perhaps the most innocent continent in terms of its contributions to climate change, but they will be the victims.”

 

Read the report

Global investors choose sustainable farming, clean energy and green cities in Africa

The Global Innovation Lab for Climate Finance, a group of more than 60 major investors, banks, foundations, and governments, has announced the launch of six inter-related climate finance initiatives aimed at raising billions of dollars to support clean energy, sustainable agriculture, and low carbon cities in developing countries. The Lab has mobilised nearly $2bn for climate action and sustainable development since its creation in 2014

The six new financial instruments target four key focus areas relating to climate mitigation and adaptation, marine and coastal restoration for carbon sequestration, sustainable smallholder farming in Africa, renewable energy access in Rwanda, and low carbon cooling and air pollution projects in cities.

The new instruments endorsed by the Lab show great potential to open up new markets and opportunities for effective and ambitious action on climate change.

Supported projects include the Restoration Insurance Service Company, a social enterprise that invests in mangrove restoration and conservation in areas with high-value coastal assets, and the Blockchain Climate Risk Crop Insurance platform to boost climate resilience of crops and farmers in West and Central Africa.

Others such as Cooling as a Service, which aims to decrease energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions from cooling use in cities through a pay-per-service model for more efficient air conditioning, and Solar Securitization for Rwanda, a tradable security designed to help solar developers increase access to expansion capital, have also been announced.

Power One AB consider hydrogen in Burundi

 

Power One´s concept combines wind, water and sun as sources of energy production. This reduces the need for expensive storage. Power One plans to use electrolyte storage, but will also set aside part of the solar park to operate a hydrogen gas production plant, which can be used, among other things, to operate boats. Since Tanganyika Lake is still clean and crystal clear, the electric propulsion of boats is an obvious complement for preserving it undisturbed. At present, there are a number of vessels operating on oil, which are used but have not so far done too much damage. Hydrogen has the advantage of being considerably cheaper as a fuel then fossil fuel, and is therefore an irresistible substitute from all points of view.

 

Hydrogen can be used for electrically driven transport on both land and water. During manufacture, water is divided into oxygen and hydrogen. The hydrogen gas is collected in tubes and then transformed into electricity via a so-called power cell. With a hydrogen tube, a power cell and an electric motor, many electric vehicles are operated today, ranging from mopeds, cars and trucks to boats. It is a durable and well-proven technology whose only residual product is oxygen and water. Oxygen is used in everything from healthcare to welding and is an import commodity in Burundi. Both oxygen and hydrogen can therefore be sold with good profits for Power One.

 

 

Hydrogen is a well-known and reliable energy storage system that has been used in industry for almost a century. The technique is simple: DC voltage produced during the day from solar panels is used in an electrolyser to separate water (H2O) into hydrogen (H2) and oxygen (O). The non-polluting oxygen is released and the hydrogen is stored under pressure into simple and durable containers. At night, when the sun is on the other side, hydrogen is led into a power cell that melts hydrogen with oxygen from the air back into water. Through this process, energy from daylight is restored back to electricity and used for night consumption.

 

If the solar park produces more energy under daylight than is consumed during the day and at night, the excess can be used to produce hydrogen for other applications, e.g. transport on the lake. In this case, hydrogen is transferred to gas tubes in the boats and then converted back to electricity via a fuel cell. This then provides electricity to the electric motor in the boat.

 

This is a very simple, well tested and durable system. With a simple pressure tank, a fuel cell and an electric motor, hydrogen can be used to operate all transport, including air, and today most of the major car manufacturers have developed hydrogen cars. The conversion of the region's boats to hydrogen operation is quite simple and plans are underway to start a rebuilding yard in Kabonga fishing port for this.

 

- By introducing an environmentally smart and emission-free boat traffic on Lake Tanganyika, Burundi will also market itself in quality tourism and offer an ecological alternative to other countries, says Janvier Nsengiumva, Commercial chief Port of Bujumbura.

African Kiira goes electric

Kiira Moptors in Uganda has launched Africas first electric hybrids. As some parts of the continent still lacks electricity Kiira has choose to start its introduction of electric vehicles with two hybrids. The combination of two power sources fits the market and will ensure that the introduction will be sucessful in all areas of the continent.

Paul Isaac Musasizi, CEO of Kiira Motors, said that the initial requirements for production will be in place by December 2019. By turning electric the company will generate 2,000 direct jobs and about 12,000 indirect jobs for Ugandans.

The introduced models are Kiira EV POC - the first electric vehicle in Africa; the Kiira EV Smack - the first hybrid electric vehicle in Africa; and Kayoola Solar Bus - the first solar powered electric bus in Africa.

Kiira EV POC - the first electric vehicle in Africa

 

 

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A taxi business only for women and children

Her name is 37-year-old Sade Agboola and she started her own taxi company whose cars will only be driven by women. To launch this concept, it was inspired by the public announcement of the decision of King Salman of Saudi Arabia to allow the women of the country to drive.

British and mother of a child, Sade Agboola has started the activities of Annisa Cars since October 2017. It is now a taxi company whose customers are only women and children. And, Annisa Cars vehicles are driven only by women. The goal is for women and children to return home safely.

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New Trade Deal Could Boost Africa's Economy by $3.4 Trillion

Africa is poised to transform its economy — if the latest trade deal becomes successful.

African leaders have announced that the long-talked about continental free-trade zone is now a reality. The African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA) will see the 55 member states of the African Union working as a single economic unit that’s expected to turn the continent into a $3.4 trillion export economy.

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Nuvens Watch - The first African smart watch

At a time when digital is more and more present in our daily lives, digital innovation has begun to develop on the African continent in recent years to propose solutions that, in the long term, will improve the daily life in Africa. . Ken Kelvin M'Baz, co-founder of the Nuvens Technology start-up company, is behind the first-ever African smart medical watch called Nuvens Watch.

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