A photo of Peter Rinaldo

Peter Rinaldo

COO Blockhomes
Peter Rinaldo has worked for over thirty years as an investigative journalist and documentary filmmaker for SVT and TV4 in Sweden and for a number of international broadcasters. His main area of journalism has been the causes and long-term effects of war and malice throughout the world. In recent years, he has devoted himself to developing renewable energy and real estate. His contact network for finding good investment objects is a great opportunity for investors in Blockhomes.

Going greener is moore than a smart move for businesses

More and more consumers are becoming aware of the need for informed decisions in their choices if we are to save what’s left of the planet’s depleted natural environments and mitigate the effects of climate change through reduced carbon emissions.

In response, more and more business are seeking to reduce their environmental impacts. Single-use plastic products are increasingly being phased out in favor of better alternatives. Going green is not only a responsible course of action for many businesses but a financially acute move as well.

 

VIEW SOURCE

Burundi: part of the solution, not the problem

While every country in the world suffers from the impacts of climate change, some have no part in the creation of the problem. 

A report has shown that Burundi is the smallest contributor of carbon dioxide in the world. In fact, Burundi’s per capita emissions of 0.027 tonnes is so low it’s often rounded to zero.

The report shows that the top ten most food vulnerable countries combined produce just 0.08% of global CO2. Russia’s per capita emissions are 454 times larger than Burundi, America’s is 581 times while the average Saudi generates the equivalent CO2 as 719 Burundians.

"What is quite clear is that climate change is not only a global health crisis, it is a moral crisis," said Samuel Myers, Principal Research Scientist at Harvard University’s Department of Environmental Health.

As well as slashing emissions the other side of the climate coin is helping the likes of Burundi to build resilience and adapt to climate change while at the same time developing in a sustainable way that allows them to survive and thrive. Many of these poor countries have vast untapped potentials. Not only in natural resources, but mainly in their human resources. Africa have a thriving ingenuity in finding sustainable energy free solutions to be shared and adapted for sustainable production. With the right financial and technological support this can also strengthen their resilience to climate change. The international finance market need to redress and modernise to ensure early and adequate response to climate change.

Burundi is recovering from a civil war that lasted over a decade and claimed the lives of around 300,000 people - and displaced even more. It has largely remained peaceful since the end of the war, and has now transformed into a nation thriving of ingenuity. But agricultural livelihoods have been affected in recent years by an increasingly variable climate. It is some times difficult for farmers who have achieved food security to move beyond this. Farmers need assistance to adapt to a changing climate and extract the greatest possible value from their harvest.

- Burundi is a living testament to the injustice of the climate crisis. Despite producing almost no carbon emissions, Burundi is on the front line of climate change, suffering from higher temperatures, lower crop yields and increasingly unreliable rains, said Dr Doreen Stabinsky, Professor of Global Environmental Politics at the College of the Atlantic in Maine. “

Only last month, a study in Lancet Planetary Health showed that over the next 30 years, climate change combined with increasing carbon dioxide could significantly reduce the availability of critical nutrients like protein, iron, and zinc. One of the authors of that study, Dr Samuel Myers, Principal Research Scientist at Harvard University’s Department of Environmental Healthsaid: “Our research shows that rising concentrations of CO2 in the atmosphere are reducing the nutritional quality of the food we eat and that the most vulnerable people to these impacts are those least responsible for rising global CO2 concentrations.”

The findings highlight the inequality at the heart of the global climate crisis, with the most vulnerable around the world set to pay the price for the actions of those in richer nations.

As well as climate impacts such as prolonged droughts or severe flooding directly is now causing food insecurity in many vulnerable nations. Climate change is also exacerbating other threats to food security. It is a similar story around the world, where in nations such as the Democratic Republic of Congo droughts and crop failures inflame existing conflicts and social tension.

To address the problem in the fairest way the richest countries must lead the way on dramatic emissions cuts, the report argues, while poorer nations must be given more support to 'leapfrog' fossil fuel development and roll out renewable power at scale.

Government funding is essential, but there is a compelling business case for businesses to support climate security initiatives as a means of aiding economic development in emergeing markets, improving supply chain resilience, and averting the reputational and financial risks. But there is hope coming also from the private sector.

Modern blockchain technology is now paving the road for fractionalised investing, but that is only one example. There are many more.

In cooperation with Blockhomes Burundi, the Swedish company Power One AB is now introducing a modern method of financing renewable energy in the Kabonga region in southern Burundi. Through this system the area will be electrified with renewable energy distributed through a smart grid containing high speed internet.

- Combined with a planned education facility for modern sustainable economics, marketing and blockchain technology. we will build a show case for a future decentralised economy built on renewable energy, global communication and less intermediaries, says Séraphine Barigenera, COO Blockhomes Burundi

 

Cigarette butts are the single greatest source of ocean trash

Cigarette butts have long been the single most collected item on the world’s beaches, with a total of more than 60 million collected over 32 years.
Environmentalists have taken aim at the targets systematically, seeking to eliminate or rein in big sources of ocean pollution — first plastic bags, then eating utensils and, most recently, drinking straws.
Yet the number one contaminant in the world’s oceans is the small but ubiquitous cigarette butt — and it has mostly avoided regulation. That soon could change, if a group of committed activists has its way.
 

The impact of climate change cause trauma in Iceland

The first ever national survey examining the human impact of the climate emergency, revealed  that more than 90% of islanders interviewed fully accept that the climate crisis is happening, with a further 76% claiming to have personally experienced global heating in their daily lives, from coping with dangerous sea ice journeys to having sled dogs euthanised for economic reasons tied to shorter winters. Islanders are therefore struggling to reconcile impact of global heating with traditional way of life, survey finds

According to its lead author, Kelton Minor, the survey finally gives Greenland’s most remote and inaccessible communities a voice on the climate crisis.

He said: “The Arctic is a bellwether for the unequal impact of global warming on social and economic systems. As countries struggle to limit future risks and overall warming to 1.5C [an increase of 2.7F], many Arctic and Greenlandic residents are already living in regional climates that have changed by more than this, in less than a lifetime.

View source

A new efficient Hydrogen Powered Car That Emits Water Instead Of Carbon Dioxide

It’s been a long road for fuel cell cars to get to where they are now, a possible option. It all started back in the 1980s when fuel-cells themselves had to be physically shrunk to fit into a normal car, not the back of a van. Then they had to make them affordable and the fuel able to be widely available. All of these obstacles have been overcome yet fuel cell cars still have not been mass adopted.

That is because they were not found to be very efficient. To produce the gas, compress it, and transport it is costly. However, there is a special little fuel cell car called Rasa that is drastically more economical and its creator has come up with a more efficient hydrogen distribution system too. The car and the system around are both part of a grand plan by the company Riversimple, founded by Hugo Spowers, former motor racer and mechanical engineer of race cars.

 

View source

Rwanda opens up for African migrants refused by Europe

The situation for African refugees in Libya, and the unwillingness of EU to facilitate them, has sparked the president of the tiny country of Rwanda to help out.

President Kagame welcomed the “opportunity for Rwanda to also support refugees stranded in Libya, at these difficult times”.

The Rwandan offer is consistent with Mr Kagame’s record of engagement in the migration problem.

- The desperate situation in Libya is disturbing and we are prepared to provide support and sanctuary for our African brothers who are stuck in the immigration debacle in Libya, and who are willing to move to Rwanda,” President Kagame said.

President Kagame are among many African leaders invited to the G7 meeting scheduled for August 24-26 in French coastal town of Biarritz. The issue of resettling the African immigrants is expected to feature in the meeting.

- We are indeed exploring the Rwandan evacuation option alongside the African Union as we try to find a solution to this,” Vincent Cochetel, UN High Commissioner for Refugees special envoy for the Central Mediterranean said.

View source

The latest company powered by 100 per cent clean energy

"This is a project that exemplifies using business to have a positive impact on the planet and people living on the planet," said Darcy Shiber-Knowles, senior quality, sustainability and innovation manager at Dr. Bronner's. "The scale of it and the potential for it to be replicated as a model are all really exciting. I want this type of model to be copied and I hope it spreads."
- We are sure it will! 

View Source

A Brief History of Economic Rebellion - For Reflection

Government dominance of human beings via slavery and violent economic oppression is as old as government itself. For thousands and thousands of years kings and rulers, usually held to be “appointed by God,” have used free, non-violent individuals as their tax farm livestock to exploit for economic gain and political power. 

 

VIew Source

Heat wave hits Greenland, melting 11 billion tons of ice

GLOBAL WARMING - A FACT.
Greenland's ice sheet — which covers 80 percent of the island — typically melts in summer, beginning around the end of May. This year, however, it began earlier in the month and has been melting since then, primarily because the country has seen abnormally high temperatures.
Greenland's capital city of Nuuk recorded temperatures in the high 50s this week; normal temperatures are about 10 degrees cooler.

View Source

CBD Shows Promise As Antibiotic Against Resistant Superbugs

Antibiotic resistance is “one of the biggest threats to global health, food security, and development today” says The World Health Organization (WHO). It can affect anyone, of any age, in any country. It is a huge health problem today as a growing number of infections such as pneumonia, tuberculosis, and gonorrhea are becoming increasingly difficult to treat.

Given cannabidiol’s documented anti-inflammatory effects, existing safety data in humans, and potential for varied delivery routes, it is a promising new antibiotic worth further investigation. The combination of inherent antimicrobial activity and potential to reduce damage caused by the inflammatory response to infections is particularly attractive.

View source

World's First Train Line Powered Directly by Solar Energy Will Launch Soon

The world’s first railway lines directly powered by sunlight are set to launch next month in the United Kingdom.

 The new, super-modern train setup will bring zero-emission energy to Aldershot station in southern England by connecting the train lines directly to nearby solar panels, which in turn will provide traction current. South Western Railways is working with solar rail enterprise Riding Sunbeams to bring the project to light.
 
View source

Sustainable investments in Burundi

Blockhomes Burundi has now contracted Raire Invest for the financing of Power One, a 12 MW power plant in Kabonga, Burundi.

Blockhomes Burundi has been assigned by Burundi's Energy Ministry to handle the electrification of Kabonga-a previously non-electrified region in southern Burundi. The area is incredibly beautiful and lies along Tanganyika's beach towards the border with Tanzania.

Thirty-one thousand families are living in Kabonga, who mainly feed on agriculture and fishing. Kabonga community is located by the lake, but most residents live on their farms.

Currently, about 3,000 customers have registered, but the influx continues and is expected to grow to at least 5,000 before the plant is put into operation.

Through the area flows a small river with a steady flow all year round. The fall height is over one hundred meters. From this, hydropower will be extracted with several modern small-scale power plants, which do not harm the river's biological diversity. At the beach of Tanganyika, the wind is suitable for wind power. However, the primary source and central for electricity production is a 10MW solar park located on a high plateau a bit up from the lake.

Since the area of Kabonga has not been electrified previously, Blockhomes Burundi will also install a new electricity network, stable internet connection, and a digital pre-payment system. The customers who have registered today have smartphones and will thus prepay their electricity consumption via an app.

Blockhomes Burundi now offers investors the opportunity to start building Power One at an early stage.

The energy plant in Kabonga is exclusively renewable, also the storage. No CO2 compensation is, therefore, necessary for energy production. On the other hand, the electrification will lead to jobs and economic growth in the area, and thus increased consumption and emissions associated with it.

Therefore, for every $ 100 invested in the energy plant, Blockhomes Burundi will arrange the planting of a tree through the Tree4Life campaign.

 

Bitcoin will cost $100,000 by the end of 2021

As the most popular cryptocurrency asset gains ground, recovering from the epic slump to $3,126 in December 2018, experts and cryptocurrency enthusiasts become bolder in their bullish forecasts.

Thus, Anthony Pompliano aka "Pomp," co-founder of crypto asset management firm Morgan Creek Digital Assets, expects that one bitcoin will go for $100,000 by the end of 2021. 

View source

A taxi business only for women and children

Her name is 37-year-old Sade Agboola and she started her own taxi company whose cars will only be driven by women. To launch this concept, it was inspired by the public announcement of the decision of King Salman of Saudi Arabia to allow the women of the country to drive.

British and mother of a child, Sade Agboola has started the activities of Annisa Cars since October 2017. It is now a taxi company whose customers are only women and children. And, Annisa Cars vehicles are driven only by women. The goal is for women and children to return home safely.

View source

Plastic waste reduction is top of the global agenda

Inaction is not an option as government and the packaging industry strive to cut waste and introduce a circular economy

When it comes to packaging, everyone agrees on the need for change. Consumers, green campaigners, government bodies, supermarkets and retailers all want a shift in the way we make and recycle packaging materials, especially plastic.

View source

A President and a National Energy Policy gone awry

Trump sees environmental issues as an obstacle to making a profitT. He is rolling back efforts to curb CO2 and methane releases while making it easier for coal companies to dump their waste into streams and car makers to avoid building engines that get better gas mileage.

Trump’s agenda, though, won’t be easy to carry out. For starters, the Republican Party, if it has any hope of expanding its base, it will have to recruit younger voters who care about clean air and water.

View source

The clean energy market is developing rapidly in Minnesota

Minnesota’s early start and continued support of clean energy policies creates a competitive advantage.

The clean energy market is developing rapidly, reducing the state’s dependence on imported energy. Biofuels production capacity, energy efficiency savings, and solar and wind installations all had triple-digit percentage growth between 2000 and 2012.

Employment in clean energy sectors reached 15,300 in 2014. Clean energy employment in Minnesota surged 78 percent between January 2000 and the first quarter of 2014, growing steadily through the recession. The state’s total employment grew 11 percent over the last 15 years.

View source

Trump Tells Congresswomen to ‘Go Back’ to the Countries They Came From

President Trump said on Sunday that a group of four minority congresswomen feuding with Speaker Nancy Pelosi should “go back” to the countries they came from rather than “loudly and viciously telling the people of the United States” how to run the government.

Wrapped inside that insult, which was widely established as a racist trope, was a factually inaccurate claim: Only one of the lawmakers was born outside the country.

View source

Fundstrat head analyst Thomas Lee responds to Trumps twitter on Bitcoin

Earlier this week the US Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell made media waves and rocked crypto Twitter when he suggested that Bitcoin is a speculative store of value that functions similarly to an investment in gold. President Trump, who is often at loggerheads with the Federal Reserve, quickly responded by tweeting that Bitcoin is not money and simply a speculative instrument which is often used to facilitate crime. 

Now, Fundstrat head analyst and partner Thomas Lee has weighed in on the issue and according to him Trump’s tweet will have the unintended effect of bringing more attention to Bitcoin. Lee explained that Trump’s disdain for Bitcoin, Facebook’s Libra and cryptocurrencies in general “makes the other 99% more aware” of Bitcoin and funny enough Trump’s signature phrase “Bad publicity is sometimes better than no publicity at all.” 

View source

Heavy rain and floods in India's Assam kill at least 10 and displace more than 1 million

Heavy monsoon rains in India's northeast Assam state displaced more than a million people from their homes and flash floods killed at least 10 in the past 72 hours, state authorities said on Saturday, warning the situation could worsen in coming days.

The Brahmaputra river, which flows from the Himalayas into India and then through Bangladesh, has burst its banks, swamping more than 1,800 villages in the state.

"10 people have died in separate incidents of drowning in the past three days and more than one million people (have been) affected, with the flood situation turning grave," a state government flood bulletin said.

View source

Modern home that generates all of its own energy

When a couple decided to “break free” and realize their long-awaited eco-friendly dream home, they turned to Chapel Hill-based architect Arielle Condoret Schechter to bring their vision to life. With their grown son now out of the house, the couple wanted to downsize to a simple modernist home where they could peacefully age in place. Nestled in a secluded place in the woods of Chatham County, North Carolina, the resulting sustainable home is custom-designed to meet all their needs, from achieving net-zero energy to its modernist design with architectural elements inspired by the Netherlands-based De Stijl movement of the early 1900s.

View source

Modern precision agriculture could help farmers reduce fertiliser use

Synthetic fertilizers aren’t great for natural ecosystems, but they do help farmers produce the crop yields needed to feed the world’s skyrocketing population. Since major chemical companies began pushing fertilizers, farmers have been spraying their fields and hoping for the best. Over the past two decades, however, controlled-release fertilizers have become available with high-precision release formulas that are not only better for the plants but are arguably better for the planet.

View source

Finnish company makes protein powder from carbon dioxide

According to Solar Foods, Solein is “100 times more climate friendly” than all other animal- and plant-based proteins. In fact, the company also claims it is 10 times more efficient than soy production in terms of carbon footprint.

How does it work? The company says it mixes water molecules with nutrients like potassium and sodium and then feeds the solution plus carbon to microbes. The microbes consume the nutrients and produce an edible substance that looks like flour and is 50 percent protein.

View source

Antarctica is melting faster than anyone thought

Ice melting rates in Antarctica tripled between 2012 and 2017, according to a study published in the journal Nature.The biggest increase has been ice melt in West Antarctica, where glaciers and ice sheets are vulnerable to warmer ocean temperatures.Experts think that if we don't get climate change under control quickly, ice sheets in West Antarctica could collapse, leading to rapid sea level rise around the globe.

View source

Climate Deniers Exposed: Top Scientist Got Funding from ExxonMobil, Koch Brothers, Big Coal

A new investigation exposes how one of the top scientists involved in denying climate change has failed to disclose his extensive funding from the fossil fuel industry. Dr. Wei-Hock Soon of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics has downplayed global warming and rejected human activity as its cause, arguing the sun is more responsible than greenhouse gases from pollution. Climate denialists — including Republican Senator James Inhofe, chair of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee — frequently cite Soon’s work to reject concrete action. But documents obtained by the Climate Investigations Center show Soon received more than $1.2 million from fossil fuel corporations and conservative groups over the last decade and failed to disclose those ties in most of his scientific papers. Funders include ExxonMobil, the American Petroleum Institute, coal utility Southern Company and the Charles G. Koch Foundation.

View source

Indigenous tribe celebrates court decision to protect Amazon rainforest

The Waorani indigenous tribe are celebrating the decision of a court in Ecuador that will prevent the sale of land in the Amazon rainforest to oil companies.
 

A court in Ecuador has upheld a ruling that prevents the government from selling land in the Amazon rainforest to oil companies, a move activists called a historic win for the Waorani indigenous tribe living there.

View source

Electric ferry to set sail in Denmark

The world's most powerful electric ferry harbouring the largest battery pack ever installed in a seafaring vessel is primed to begin transporting passengers, operator Ærø Kommune announced today. 
The Ellen E-ferry will be the first electric ferry to have no back-up generator on board.
 
View source

New stock exchange for responsible investors

If regulators give their approval, Scotland's first new stock exchange in nearly 50 years will launch this year to list securities with measurable environmental or social outcomes

From renewable energy companies to social housing funds, investors around the world are increasingly drawn to organisations that offer social or environmental as well as financial returns.

Now, a new breed of market is springing up from Scotland to India to help them identify investment opportunities - and make it easier for organisations that seek to do good to raise funds.

If regulators give their approval, Scotland's first new stock exchange in nearly 50 years will launch this year to list securities - tradeable assets, such as bonds, funds and stocks and shares - with measurable environmental or social outcomes.

View source

Barcelona Is Threatening To Shut Out Tourists

Barcelona has no room to grow and people just keep coming. No number of pavement expansions and bus rerouting can solve the fundamental issue that tourism is the number one problem for the city. 

In June 2019, Barcelona was named the number one most polluted port in Europe, with the highest amounts of sulphur oxide and carcinogenic nitrogen oxide coming from visiting cruise ships. Cruise ships are a particular problem because they run on fuel oil, which contains far more sulphur oxide than ordinary diesel.

 

 

 

Jessica Folcker Named New Sustainability Ambassador at The Sprinkle Group

Jessica Folcker, formerly known as The Sprinkle Group’s assistant influencer/blogger, has been promoted to Sustainability Ambassador. This is a new role within The Sprinkle Group that aims to ensure that the company is constantly maintaining eco-friendly business standards in the workplace and promoting awareness for our current environmental crisis.

As Sustainability Ambassador, Jessica has her hand in each of Sprinkle’s subsidiary companies. Her responsibilities include, but are not limited to: striving to create sustainable business solutions by generating new ideas, establishing partnerships, and promoting information about sustainable research and practices with the Sprinkle network.

 "This is a very engaging task and exactly what I want to do. There is nothing more important today than to reverse the global warming and make sure we never go back to the careless greed of last century industrialism. Therefore I am sure I will be a very dedicated sustainability ambassador at Sprinkle!", says Jessica. 

View source

Dutch airline KLM calls for people to fly less

The Netherlands’ national airline urges people to ‘fly responsibly’ and to invest in its carbon-offsetting scheme

Dutch airline KLM has launched a campaign asking people to fly less. The video and open letter from CEO Pieter Elbers asks: “Do you always have to meet face-to-face?” and “Could you take the train instead?”

The campaign aims to encourage travellers and the aviation industry to consider the environmental impact of flying. It describes the “shared responsibility” of travellers and airlines to “fly more responsibly”, and says those in the industry need to “create a sustainable future for aviation”.

View source

Eight ways to halt global food crisis

Those living in the urban global north are very comfortable with having any foods desired available at any point across the calendar year. This comes at a high cost. Foods transported by air cause nearly four times the CO₂ released compared to truck and 38 times that of a comparable amount transported by rail. Biodiversity and ecosystem loss threatens food production – and meanwhile, agriculture is a key driver of this loss.

If we are to avoid some of these crises, we need to re-imagine where our food comes from and move, at least in part, towards more seasonal diets with a lower use of land and a serious reduction in global trade – especially for fruits, vegetables, and protein.

We can do all of this by addressing eight factors that have exacerbated and reinforced environmental disasters in our food systems. a $3.4 trillion export economy.

View source

New Trade Deal Could Boost Africa's Economy by $3.4 Trillion

Africa is poised to transform its economy — if the latest trade deal becomes successful.

African leaders have announced that the long-talked about continental free-trade zone is now a reality. The African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA) will see the 55 member states of the African Union working as a single economic unit that’s expected to turn the continent into a $3.4 trillion export economy.

View source

What AI-Driven Decision Making Looks Like

Many companies have adapted to a “data-driven” approach for operational decision-making. Data can improve decisions, but it requires the right processor to get the most from it. Many people assume that processor is human. The term “data-driven” even implies that data is curated by — and summarized for — people to process.

View source

The Future of Work is Distributed

Businesses of every shape and size are adopting more flexible work environments—from working from home policies to flex time to compressed work schedules. Millennials are all but demanding greater flexibility. 70% of employees say going into the office isn’t necessary. This strong preference has created a ripe breeding ground for distributed work. Employees aren’t just wanting to work more flexible hours or work from home. Entire companies have taken flexible work to the max and become fully distributed. 23% of remote workers now say their organization is fully distributed. 

View source

Tesla’s new Solar Roof V3 will be same price as shingle roof

Elon Musk is suggesting that the new version of Tesla’s solar roof tiles will be even less expensive and it will roughly be the equivalent of the cost of a comp shingle roof and the electric utility bill, which the solar roof will slash through solar energy generation.

When launching the product, Tesla said that the “typical homeowner can expect to pay $21.85 per square foot for a Solar Roof.” But that style was a tile roof style, which is much more expensive than a comp shingle roof – indicating that Tesla would have made cost improvements.


A shingle roof can cost as little as $4 per square foot while a tile roof can cost up to $20 per square foot.

It’s still a fairly expensive product, but it comes with a lifetime of the house warranty and 30-year power generation guaranteed.

View source

Edible film made from essential oils can protect foods better than plastic

Forget the plastic and chemicals: The best food preservatives may actually be all-natural essential oils. New research published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that an edible film coated in the essential oils of clove and oregano kept bread fresher for longer than conventional plastic combined with a food preservative known as calcium propionate.

View source

Donald Trump stopping US government scientists from speaking out publicly.

The Trump administration’s decision to stop Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) officials and other government staff from speaking out publicly has prompted the country’s leading scientific organisation to warn against “censorship and intimidation”.

In addition to the media blackout at the EPA, some other federal agencies were also banned from external communications. Donald Trump even appointed Scott Pruitt, who is known as a climate science denier, to run the EPA.

The ban includes the issuing of press releases, blogs, messages on Twitter and Facebook posts. All media requests must be “screened” by the administration.

The American Association for the Advancement of Science warns against "censorship and intimidation", and Sam Adams, the US director of the World Resources Institute, called for the bans to be lifted.

“These actions will stem the free flow of information and have a chilling effect on staff in these agencies,” he said.

View source

Swiss watchmaker using blockchain tech

The 263-year-old Geneva-headquartered watchmaker Vacheron Constantin has spent over two-and-a-half centuries protecting the traditional crafts around handmade watches.

But it is also a brand that’s willing to embrace bleeding-edge 21st-century tech.

At the VivaTechnology conference in Paris last month, it announced that it was rolling out the blockchain technology for its Les Collectineurs series of vintage watches.
Blockchain is a largely impenetrable system that is immune to efforts to externally tamper with the system. Therefore, the watch brand is using it to issue digital certificates that establish the authenticity of the watches.

These digital certificates issued via the blockchain platform will accompany the traditional physical paper certificates issued for each watch.

View source

UAE entities sign deal to build largest desalination plant in the northern emirates

The Federal Electricity and Water Authority (FEWA) and a consortium consisting of ACWA Power and MDC Power Holding Company, an entity fully owned by Mubadala Investment, has entered into a water purchase agreement for a desalination plant in Umm Al Quwain.

The 150 million gallon per day desalination plant will utilise seawater reverse osmosis technology, a statement said.

It is strategically located between Ajman, Umm Al Quwain and Ras Al Khaimah.

View source

A rising star of the hacker sphere

It was during the last Pwn2Own (pronounced pone any yardstick), the most important competition in the field of the search of computer faults, in March 2019, that Amat Cama and his friend Richard Zhu managed to hack, in less than fifteen minutes, the built-in browser of the Tesla 3, the latest model of the brand. "A first step that will then search for other bugs in the car," says Amat. They hope to succeed soon a complete piracy to control the vehicle. "We are working on it," he says, mischievous.

"We are White Hats, ethical hackers with computer expertise. Our goal is to reveal technological loopholes to allow businesses to fill them before they are exploited by malicious people, "says Amat.

View source

Nuvens Watch - The first African smart watch

At a time when digital is more and more present in our daily lives, digital innovation has begun to develop on the African continent in recent years to propose solutions that, in the long term, will improve the daily life in Africa. . Ken Kelvin M'Baz, co-founder of the Nuvens Technology start-up company, is behind the first-ever African smart medical watch called Nuvens Watch.

View source

Cotton waste biofuel powers farmers to fight drought in Kenya

Farmers use the cleaner, cheaper fuel - which requires no extra land to grow its feedstock - to run irrigation pumps, making them less vulnerable to poor rains
The farmers earnings had doubled in the two years they have been pumping water using biodiesel, which is both more efficient and 20 shillings ($0.20) per litre cheaper than regular diesel.

The biodiesel they are using is also good news for the planet.

Unlike most biofuels, which are derived from crops such as maize, sugarcane, soybean, rapeseed and jatropha, it is made from a byproduct of the cotton-making process.

That means that as well as being cleaner and cheaper than regular fuel, it is more sustainable than other biofuels because no extra land is needed to produce it.

View source

France Will Charge Ecotax On Most Flights

French officials have announced a new “ecotax” for nearly all flights departing from the country beginning in 2020.

Elizabeth Borne, France’s transportation minister, said the measure comes amid a time of “ecological urgency,” per a translation of her announcement by NPR.

“With the eco-contribution, air transport will play its part in financing the daily transport of all our citizens,” Borne said.

View source

Window film captures and releases solar energy

Developed at Sweden's Chalmers University, the MOST film incorporates a norbornadiene–quadricyclane molecule. This causes the transparent polymer film to take on an orangey-yellow color when not being directly exposed to sunlight.

Once the sun rises in the morning and its rays strike the material, however, much of the sunlight's solar energy is absorbed by the molecule. More specifically, the molecule captures some of the incoming photons, causing it to isomerize – this means that it temporarily becomes another type of molecule, with exactly the same atoms but in a different arrangement.

As a result, the film not only turns completely colorless, but it also keeps much of the solar heat from getting into the room. The interior of the building thus stays cooler than it would otherwise, reducing the need to run the air conditioning.

In the evening, though – once the sun's rays are no longer hitting the film – the molecule reverts to its previous form, releasing the stored energy into the room as heat for up to eight hours. This reduces the need for the building's heating system to kick in.

View source

5 ways to boost sustainable trade in the world’s poorest countries

The World Trade Organization’s (WTO) Aid for Trade initiative is designed to connect developing countries to the global trade system in a sustainable manner.
Aid for trade can be a means to implement sustainable development strategies guided by sound environmental principles. This includes sustainability standards in industry, the promotion of climate-resilient infrastructure, the maintenance of ecosystem services through reforestation, the encouragement of sustainable agricultural practices and the transition to clean and affordable energy.

View source

A race for talent in the Fourth Industrial Revolution

As the Fourth Industrial Revolution unfolds, led by advances in technologies such as data science and artificial intelligence, the labour market is again changing in a fundamental fashion. In 2018 the Future of Jobs Survey and Report revealed that business leaders believe that by 2022, human workers and automated processes are set to share the workload of current tasks equally, while a range of new roles is expected to emerge simultaneously as digital innovation is absorbed across industries and regions.

View source

Singapore to Exempt Bitcoin from Tax

Global development and growth in the use of cryptocurrencies have caused tax jurisdictions to review their GST position on cryptocurrencies transactions.

Several countries, such as Japan and Switzerland, are already taking action to boost the growth of their crypto industry.

Most recently, the Inland Revenue Authority of Singapore (IRAS), acknowledging the importance and growth of crypto assets, proposed legislation to exempt cryptocurrencies from the Goods and Services Tax.
The new tax treatment would take effect on January 1, 2020.

View source

How some Republicans in Florida turned into eco-warriors

Many in Florida blame the then Governor Scott for pushing policies that put business first and the environment second, all with a blind eye to how clearly those two are intertwined in Florida. Today many Floridians blame much of the water pollution – and therefore the algae problem – on the sugar industry, or “big sugar”.
“Unlike other areas of the country, there’s a strong conservative tradition here in Florida for actually being pro-environment,” he explained. “If we have clean water, it’s a good idea for beaches and tourism.”, say Jason Evans, an assistant professor of environmental science and an environmental policy expert who makes an effort to talk to Republican voters and politicians about green issues.
“I have talked with Republicans privately who acknowledge the science of climate change but have also said pretty explicitly that they can’t talk about it, because their base voters have been conditioned to say that climate change is something that Republicans don’t believe in.”

View source

Harvesting rain water for irrigation in Nepal

Government-backed storage ponds are helping farmers face up to unpredictable rainfall linked to climate change.

In south-central Nepal's Palpa district, which spans from the country's hillsides to its southern lowlands, farmers can grow a huge range of crops, from coffee to paddy rice, lychees to wheat.

But none of the crops grow without water - and that is increasingly in short supply in Palpa, as climate change brings more weather extremes.

View source

A solution for overstocked warehouses and its negative impact on the environment?

There's a $1 trillion global industry which you've probably never heard of. It affects all kinds of brands and retailers and is growing at a rapid rate. It drives up costs, impacts cash flow, increases manufacturing and is harmful to the planet.

There are warehouses right around the globe currently piled high with goods which have been manufactured but remain unsold. They can often lie there for years or in the worst cases be destroyed. In the U.K. alone the problem of overstock accounts for around £5 billion.

One company aiming to address the problem is startup buyfair global, a B2B online marketplace auction site, specifically for overstock.

View source

How Bhutan Went Carbon-Negative

In this intimate portrait of environmentalist Sonam Phuntsho, filmmaker Matthew Firpo shows how Bhutan is the worldwide leader in environmental stewardship, with over 60 percent of its territory still forested. The Kingdom follows Phuntsho as he plants a new tree in the forest, one of more than 100,000 trees he's fostered throughout his life.

View source

Britain's National Trust to sell fossil fuel assets

Britain's National Trust will sell all of its investments in the fossil fuel industry by 2022.

The charity invests 45 million pounds ($56.61 million) in fossil fuel companies - 4% of its one billion pound stock market portfolio - despite having itself warned of the dangers of climate change.

But it will aim to offload the majority of investments in oil and gas companies, which include Shell, BP and Total, within 12 months, chief financial officer Peter Vermeulen told the Thomson Reuters Foundation by phone.

View source

Aged 24, she makes and sells eco-friendly bamboo bikes for sustainable development

Her name is Winnifred Selby, a 24-year-old girl from Ghana. At the age of 19 she co-founded her Ghana Bamboo Bikes company. A company that makes bamboo bicycles for rural people who walk for miles to work, school, market etc.


Since small she has found that her country Ghana is full of bamboo and we all know that it is a wood famous for its resistance. That's where the idea came to mind. Use this resistant wood to make a quick and inexpensive means of locomotion to help many people to move easily.

View source

Opec blame young activists for decreased investments in oil

The trillion-dollar Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (Opec) highlights the growing reputational concerns of oil companies as insurance companies are increasingly pulling investment from fossil fuel assets. 

Mohammed Barkindo, the secretary general of Opec, said the growing mass mobilisation of world opinion against oil is “beginning to … dictate policies and corporate decisions, including investment in the industry”.

He blamed the striking students and said the pressure was even being felt within the families of Opec officials because their own children “are asking us about their future because … they see their peers on the streets campaigning against this industry”.

Greta Thunberg and other climate activists have said it is a badge of honour that the head of the world’s most powerful oil cartel believes their campaign may be the greatest threat to the fossil fuel industry.

View source

Massive deforestation increase in Brazil under Bolsonaro

In the first 11 months, Brazilian deforestation has already reached 4,565 sq km (1,762 sq miles), a 15% increase over the same period in the previous year.

Deforestation rose 34% in May compared with the same month a year ago.

Bolsonaro’s office declined to comment, saying questions would be addressed by the environment ministry.

View source

Solar Panel Farm Grows Tons Of Food Without Soil, Pesticides, Fossil Fuels Or Groundwater

Sundrop Farms, a relatively new company in the business of creating sustainable agriculture, revealed their high-tech greenhouses that offer viable solutions for growing crops in otherwise unsuitable locations and all while reducing the need for finite natural resources.

The company has developed technology that integrates “solar power, electricity generation, fresh water production and hydroponics.” And according to the company, this technology produces just as much food as traditional farming, and significantly better. 

View source

Belgium Apologizes for Kidnapping Children From African Colonies

Belgium apologized on Thursday for the kidnapping, segregation, deportation and forced adoption of thousands of children born to mixed-race couples during its colonial rule of Burundi, Congo and Rwanda.

The apology is the first time that Belgium has recognized any responsibility for what historians say was the immense harm the country inflicted on the Central African nations, which it colonized for eight decades.

View source

Vietnamese supermarkets leaving plastic bags and go back to leaves

Several Vietnamese supermarkets have started using banana leaves to wrap vegetables in an effort to reduce plastic waste.

Shoppers at Lotte Mart in Ho Chi Minh City’s District 7 were recently surprised to see scallions, okra and other vegetables produce wrapped in banana leaves.

A representative of the supermarket chain said that the company is experimenting with using leaves to wrap veggies in one outlet, and plans to expand this later to the entire chain in the country.

View source

The world’s first minister for future generations

As Future Generations Commissioner for Wales, Sophie Howe’s job is – put simply – to make tomorrow a better place. Wales is currently the only country in the world to employ someone in such a position, which was created after the Welsh Assembly passed the Well-being of Future Generations Act in 2015. The trailblazing legislation requires all Welsh public bodies to ensure that the decisions they make today don’t compromise the Welsh citizens of tomorrow.

From councils and national parks to the health service, all are legally obliged to consider the long-term social, cultural, environmental and economic wellbeing impact of their decisions, in a non-party political way.

“All those things might sound obvious and straightforward, but what we have is a system that has, for decades, been constructed to do exactly the opposite,” explains Howe, a mother of five. “My job is to try and unpick that.”

View source

Why trade Wars and slow economy bring markets high

It’s not the Republican tax cuts. Those are yesterday’s news. It’s not the trade war cease fire. That’s been done before. It’s the world’s biggest central banks going to zero, or are being challenged by Wall Street to give 0% interest rates a whirl!

The market is rising because there is no other place to put investment capital. Conservative investments are money losers. You have to buy Chinese bonds or something like that. The world’s central banks are not only helping to prop up equity markets, but they are forcing everyone into it.

View source

India proposes tax benefits for electric vehicles to promote sales

India proposed tax waivers on Friday on the purchase of electric vehicles and removed import taxes on some auto components to help boost sales and reduce its dependence on fossil fuels.

India, the world's third-biggest emitter of greenhouse gases, is home to 14 of the world's most polluted cities, including the capital New Delhi, with its toxic air claiming more than one million lives in 2017.

Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman, presenting the federal budget to parliament, said buyers of electric vehicles will receive an income tax deduction of 150,000 rupees ($2,189.30) on interest paid on loans taken out to them.

View source

Technology-enabled sustainable economy

From ESG-themed data mining to blockchain voting, technologies around sustainability practice and reporting are expanding rapidly. Companies are starting to discover how they can incorporate new technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI), blockchain or the Internet of Things (IoT) to advance their environmental, social and governance (ESG) efforts and the way they report on them.
Over the past decade the world’s biggest companies have started to come under pressure from stakeholders to improve the management of natural resources and human capital.
 

How technology is driving the evolution of intelligent banking

Globally, retail banking has changed considerably over the past decade. Retail banks have adapted to changing consumer demands and expectations, new technologies (eg, artificial intelligence, AI, blockchain and the Internet of Things), new competitors (eg, neo-banks, payment players and tech giants) and new regulations (eg, open banking and PSD2) while reducing costs and creating value. These combined factors have resulted in retail banks adjusting their business models, rethinking their innovation strategies and investment focus, and altering their product offerings and how they are delivered.

View source

 

Tree planting 'has mind-blowing potential' to tackle climate crisis

Research shows a trillion trees could be planted to capture huge amount of carbon dioxide

Planting billions of trees across the world is by far the biggest and cheapest way to tackle the climate crisis, according to scientists, who have made the first calculation of how many more trees could be planted without encroaching on crop land or urban areas.

As trees grow, they absorb and store the carbon dioxide emissions that are driving global heating. New research estimates that a worldwide planting programme could remove two-thirds of all the emissions that have been pumped into the atmosphere by human activities, a figure the scientists describe as “mind-blowing”.

View source

Sustainability as Business Strategy

In recent years, a growing number of companies around the world have voluntarily adopted and implemented a broad range of sustainability practices. The accelerating rate of adoption of these practices has also provoked a debate about the nature of sustainability and its long-term implications for organizations.

View source

These Solar Panels Harvest Energy From Rain

Solar cells have a dramatically reduced performance on rainy days.
New solar panels created by Chinese researchers take energy from the friction of falling raindrops, as well as the sun, so it’s an effective source of renewable energy all year round. They could even make raincoats that charge your phone.
These panels use an energy harvesting structure that integrates a solar cell and a triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) device is built to realize power generation from both sunlight and raindrops.

View Source

Dutch firm to invest $70m in solar factory in Rwanda

At least 900,000 households, or 4.2 million people, will be connected to electricity in the next five years if the proposed solar factory begins operations.

Dutch solar firm, NOTS, has announced it will invest $70 million (about Rwf61 billion) in the production of solar lighting products in Rwanda, raising the country’s prospects of achieving universal coverage by 2024.

The development comes after the Government, early this month, said it had signed an agreement with the firm to manufacture and distribute solar home systems.

View source

Fossil fuel industry undermining global climate talks

Fossil fuel industry giants such as Exxon Mobil and Royal Dutch Shell are maintaining an outsize presence at global climate discussions, working to undermine scientific consensus and slow policy progress, according to findings released last week. The report from the Climate Investigations Center says fossil fuel trade associations have sent more than 6,400 delegates to obstruct climate talks.

View source

Scottish forest companies planted 22 million trees to fight climate change

New figures published today reveal that Scotland’s national tree planting targets have been surpassed, making a critical contribution to the global climate emergency.

11,200 hectares of new planting has been undertaken in Scotland last year, comfortably beating the current 10,000 ha annual target. Last year, 7,100 ha of new trees were planted.

The Scottish forest industry is also outstripping the rest of the UK as 84% of all new planting took place in Scotland.

View source

India plants 66 million trees in 12 hours

Volunteers in India planted more than 66 million trees in just 12 hours in a record-breaking environmental drive.
About 1.5 million people were involved in the huge plantation campaign, in which saplings were placed along the Narmada river in the state of Madhya Pradesh throughout Sunday.
India committed under the Paris Agreement to increasing its forests by five million hectares before 2030 to combat climate change.

View source

 

Dutch solar-electric car prototype revealed

Dutch electric-vehicle startup Lightyear has unveiled a prototype of its first model – a solar electric car called the 'Lightyear One' with a claimed range of 450 miles.

While it is primarily charged by plugging in like any other electric model, it also incorporates roof-mounted solar panels in order to boost range and cut down on the amount of stationary plug-in charging required.

Lightyear estimates the One would only need to be plugged in 25 times a year if covering 12,000 miles per year in the UK, compared to 54 times a year for a Tesla Model S P100D.

View source

Companies protects forests in Cameroon

Companies that use wood grown in Cameroon - from makers of guitars to electricity poles - are teaming up with the government and communities to replant depleted forests and to help revitalise endangered tree species to better sustain their businesses and bolster the fight against climate change.

The firms have teamed up with the government and villagers in public-private partnerships to restore forests because it makes sense for both their profits and the planet, they said.

View source

China support big data in Africa

Across Africa, where the cost of development is high and efficiency is low to begin with, leveraging the power of big data should be a priority. This knowledge and technology transfer can be immediately implemented between China and more developed African countries, such as Nigeria, Ghana and Kenya. While big data may have high upfront costs, some of which China’s expertise can help lower, its applications have reverberating effects.

View source

'Nude' shopping next big trend

Sales of vegetables have soared by up to 300 per cent following moves by a number of New Zealand supermarkets to ditch plastic packaging.

A group of New World supermarkets have abandoned the use of plastic wrapping for virtually all of their fruit and vegetables in a project labelled 'food in the nude'. Pioneered by the New World store at Bishopdale in Christchurch, it has led to stunning sales figures.

View source

World's Largest Solar Power Plant Switched On

As of today, the Noor Abu Dhabi project with a total capacity of 1,177MW is the largest operational single site solar project in the world.

The project, which is not state-financed, is the work of a consortium that includes Abu Dhabi Power Corporation, Japan’s Marubeni Corp and Chinese solar manufacturer Jinko Solar.

The $870 million project was the result of a competitive tender process that will see electricity from the site sold to the Emirates Water and Electricity Company (EWEC) for around 2.4 cents per kWh, a record at the time of the auction and a record for any completed solar project. It was built by the Indian firm Sterling & Wilson with nearly 3000 people working on site during the peak of activity.

View source

Retail Blockchain Supply Chain

Outside of payments, which is still mostly using cryptocurrencies rather than the underlying blockchain technology, the most active area for retail blockchain applications is in supply chain.

supply chains depend heavily on cross-border situations where smart contracts could address current processes that are dependent on a lot of paperwork

 

And that is a job for blockchain! In fact, there has been an enormous amount of activity around retail supply chain and blockchain. There are three main areas of focus: visibility, anti-counterfeit, and IoT/RFID.

 

View source

E-commerse now possible in Africa

Everything starts from a fairly recurring observation: buying online and delivering to Africa is a real headache.

To include Africa in the world of international e-commerce three young Gabonese entrepreneurs have created the keeCash app.

The solution the KeeCash team has come up with is a fully automated application allowing:

1) Online payment via mobile money 
2) Delivery to the customer without a customs procedure with attractive rates 
3) Order tracking in the application 

The users of the KeeCash application are more and more numerous with an increase of over 35% per month over the last 6 months. This is the need for Africans of such an application that takes care of everything in just a few clicks.

View source

Businesses are coming together to lead on climate change

Climate change will shape the way in which we do business for decades. Business has a vital role to play in curbing its effects by limiting carbon emissions. Business, sectors, states and regions need to consolidate efforts to create change on a level large enough to halt the crisis. There are already many examples that others can follow, and that will make transformation happen faster than ever before.

View source

View source

How a corporation patented Ethiopia’s most common staple

A Dutch company turning food in to intellectual property reveals a failed economic order. 

The agronomist Jans Roojsen, who spearheaded the project under HPFI, applied for the patent in 2003 and gained it in 2007, thus acquiring the rights to market, sell or import the grain as they wanted without the Ethiopian partnership – meaning that HPFI alone had the rights for the teff grain.

View source

New rose-inspired product make clean water

In a new paper published on 28 May in Advanced Materials, the authors report a novel water purification device inspired by a rose. The solar-steaming system is made from layered, black paper sheets shaped into petals encased in a glass jar as a novel portable water purification system. The “stem” is a tubular structure that collects untreated water from any source — including rain — which flows through the 3D petals. The system uses energy from sunlight to separate salt and other impurities from water through evaporation.

View source

Ivorian chocolatier craftsman challenge the industry

According to the International Cocoa Organization, of the $ 100 billion generated by the global chocolate industry, producing countries earn only 6% of this sum. Axel Emmanuel, Ivorian master chocolatier, is one of the entrepreneurs who wants to change the game. Specialist of personalized chocolate with African design, mixing flavors and sculpture. His concept is to make homemade chocolate made from cocoa beans from the Ivory Coast. He also trains women in the villages, while setting up small chocolatiers in the villages.

View source

 

Rioja region earns UNESCO tourism blessing

Sustainability label includes the wine, the people and the place. 

Biosphere granted Rioja Alavesa the certification based on five objectives that are defined by the World Tourism Organization:

  • Inclusive and sustainable economic growth
  • Social inclusiveness, employment and poverty reduction
  • Resource efficiency, environmental protection and climate change
  • Cultural values, diversity and heritage
  • Mutual understanding, peace and security

View source

Sweden-based Fintech company implements AI-module for Fluent Digital Presence

 

Sprinkle is implementing an AI-module in which all content and functionalities are constantly adjusting and updating to the latest trends and technology.The Sweden-based Fintech company will integrate blockchain technology for smooth investing and a unique widget that allows automated newsfeeds and digital profiles.

View source

Asia’s digital millennials: Opportunities for businesses

To keep up with increasingly sophisticated millennial consumers in Asia, companies in the region must be prepared to make a number of changes, from hiring staff to the products and platforms they build, including overhauling their online and offline strategies and thinking differently about their internal processes and the overall consumer journey.

View source

The Future Of Investing: Fintech 50

Want half a share of Apple, or bitcoin alongside protective puts? The investing, trading and wealth management firms on Forbes’ Fintech 50 2019 offer more than just the services once exclusive to big banks and traditional financial firms. They’re tapping into markets by merging new tricks with the old.

View source

Egyptian bus-booking app Swvl is poised to beat Uber in Africa after raising $42m

Swvl, an Egyptian app for booking buses, has raised $42 million as it looks to expand into other parts of Africa, including Nigeria.

“The plan is to be in at least two or three more African cities by the end of the year,’’ Mostafa Kandil, the 26-year-old founder and chief executive officer, said by phone from Cairo. “Lagos, Nigeria, is most likely the next market.’’

View source

Business as Usual Will Not Save the Planet

The  United Nations’ 17 sustainable development goals (SDGs) were explicitly designed to engage the private sector in addressing the world’s most pressing challenges. Four years into the UN’s 15-year timeline, the question is whether companies are advancing serious solutions or are simply embarking on a massive global public relations charade. Unfortunately, our internal research points to the latter.

View source

Sustainable and actionable: A study of asset-owner priorities for ESG investing in Asia

The Economist Intelligence Unit carried out interviews with some of Asia’s largest asset owner firms, development banks, sustainable investment organisations and influential industry advocates to determine how they saw the growth of environmental, social and governance (ESG) investing in Asia, as well as the AO role in it. In parallel, we review the latest research on ESG investing in the region to give an overview of sustainable investing in Asia.

View source

Millennials Are Saving Resources And Innovators Can Take Advantage

The Pew Research Center defines millennials as people born between  1981 to 1996 who are now 23 to 38 years old. According to the Census Bureau, millennials consist of 83.1 million people in the United States. They also contribute to 21% of end-user discretionary purchases, which are anticipated to exceed one trillion dollars per year. Because they tend to be environmentally conscious, millennial consumer trends are going to play a significant role in changes on the planet.

View source

Cleaning of Lake Tanganyika

(Bujumbura, Burundi) Lake Tanganyika is still clean and crystal clear but even here some plastic waste need to be removed. Blockhomes Burundi has therefore been invited by other local organisations to collaborate with them in their commitment to make the lake and the town of Bujumbura clean.

 

The Government of Burundi has issued a decree prohibiting the usage of plastic bags in 2020. In this objective, Blockhomes Burundi, represented by one of its technicians Gustave Niyongere in collaboration with other local NGOs, launched a campaign of collecting plastic waste this weekend.

The effort has been initiated by youth organisations, among them CIAD, CPAJ, and AIDB. These youth organisations have decided to conduct a fight against plastic waste everywhere in Bujumbura town and on the beach of Tanganyika lake.

This saturday 22, 2019, three lorries, representing more than 20 cubic meters of plastic waste have been collected by the youth. For these sustainable development activists, the target is: "zero plastic in Bujumbura town and on Tanganyika Lake beaches".

 

The Team

 

Blockhomes Gustave Niyongere and J. Baptiste Sibo from CIAD also plan a recycling program for the organic waste by producing electricity from the old waste and to replace plastc bags by paper bags.

The campain will be executed every two weeks. The sustainable development activists call all volunteers to join them, and financers to provide means for this initiative.

African strawberry export growing

The country of Teranga could very soon be the 2nd largest strawberry exporting country in Africa. Strawberry cultivation is becoming more prevalent in the country. This thesis is explained by the increased pragmatism of young Senegalese entrepreneurs who have now formed a network.

View source

Cobalt, the conflict mineral

An estimated 35,000 children work in perilous conditions to extract cobalt from the ground in the Democratic Republic of Congo. So what will the impact be on these exploited workers from rapid advances in electric cars, which are heavily reliant on this conflict mineral

View source